Weeding the vegetable garden

Little tiller at work
Little tiller at work in the vine garden.

James took it upon himself to run the little tiller yesterday when I was in the office at church. He did all of the items that he was sure of, but stayed out of the area that he didn’t know much about. That means he did the tomatoes and the peppers, they are surrounded by cans and cages, so you really can’t get into any trouble there. He also did the corn and the sunflowers and the zinnias and the beans since those are pretty easy to notice. The peas and the cucumbers are along the fences, so those worked out too. The problem spots were in the raised beds. Those are my spots, and he wasn’t sure of the other places that looked grassy, but might have been planted with flowers. So, today between hanging out the laundry, we finished it off together. In the meantime, he begged my aunt for her grass clippings and surrounded the rest of the tomato plants. I hope we can put off payment for the grass clippings until harvest and then can make a trade for some produce. Ha!! We will pick up future clippings if we get a heads up as to when the mower is going. We don’t have a bagger on our large mower, so we don’t get many clippings.

Tomatoes with Aunt Glenda's grass around them.
Tomatoes with Aunt Glenda’s grass around them.
Zinnias and beans from standing in the corn.
Zinnias and beans from standing in the corn.
Zinnia up close.
Zinnia up close.

I mentioned before that corn should be knee-high by July 4. Well that is not so far from now, and guess what we are already at knee-high if we get to count me. I am only of average height for a female, so I suppose it is a little short, but here is the knee in the corn picture I took today.

Corn height
Corn height

The trick is that this corn is not for eating. This is really tall corn and is the colored stuff used for decorating fall crafts and things. It is a major squirrel attractor.

Potatoes in bloom
Potatoes in bloom
Dill in the potatoes
Dill in the potatoes

I started in the raised beds with the hoe. I don’t normally thin the carrots, beets, lettuce, etc. even though I should. I figured if I lost a few to the hoe, it would be my version of thinning them. After I had the rows figured out, I went on hands and knees and pulled out the weeds. Below is after the hoe with the next one being after the hands and knees. I am hoping that we will be nibbling on fresh produce later next week.

Lettuce, radishes and spinach plot after the hoe cleaning.
Lettuce, radishes and spinach plot after the hoe cleaning.
Spinach, radishes and lettuce when fully cleaned and replanted.
Spinach, radishes and lettuce when fully cleaned and replanted.
Carrots, beets and colored cabbage
Carrots, beets and colored cabbage after the hoe cleaning.
Carrots and such after a full cleaning.
Carrots and such after a full cleaning.

The very first picture which shows James using the little tiller is in the unfenced plot. We had potatoes in it for two years, so this year it has pumpkins, cantaloupe and gourds. Before those gourds produce anything, we need to find a home for the crop from two years ago. I am hoping that the results will be something I can share on the craft blog, but who knows when that will happen.

Pumpkin patch.
Pumpkin patch.

Below are the cosmos. I am excited that they are coming this thick. Those are far and away my favorite flower because of their airy leaves.

Cosmos after James tilled the weeds.
Cosmos after James tilled the weeds.

 

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4 thoughts on “Weeding the vegetable garden

  1. You will laugh at my ignorance, but what is the tiller used for? Digging up weeds? You have a mini farm. I absolutely love hand-weeding, especially after a rain. My garden is so small that a hoe is useless. So it’s as well that I love to hand-weed. Your soil looks so dry compared to ours. After about two days without rain there are cracks in my front garden, though! It’s a bit of a drama queen, really.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We have rain then it dries and we are going on a pretty good cycle of that this summer. Hopefully July isn’t the total lack of rain that we have some years. Yes the tiller is for the weeds, we finally decided that garden is far too big for hand weeding or hoeing at our age. Glad you stopped by.

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